Modules, Magic: The Gathering, and the Next Steps for co.llide

co.llide-0.4.0-modules-black

One of our goals for ver­sion 0.4.0 of co.llide was to pro­vide a small but fairly bal­anced set of build­ing blocks, called mod­ules, for all play­ers to use in con­struct­ing ships. How­ever, vari­ety is the spice of life, and we plan to even­tu­ally release a large num­ber of unlock­able mod­ules for play­ers to add to their per­sonal col­lec­tions. In this post, I’ll be dis­cussing some ideas for these future mod­ules. I’ll also be talk­ing about a poten­tial prob­lem that we face as design­ers, and one par­tic­u­lar source of inspi­ra­tion that we believe offers the solution.

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Andrew Dolce

Andrew has a back­ground in com­puter graph­ics and aug­mented real­ity, and is excited about mak­ing games that look and feel awe­some. He also owns too many board games for his own good.

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co.llide v0.3.0 with vehicle editor!

Last week, we released ver­sion 0.3.0 of co.llide, unveil­ing the ship edi­tor! Whereas in pre­vi­ous ver­sions you could only play with a set of default designs, now you can build your own ships from an array of mod­ules. Shar­ing your designs works exactly like shar­ing an arena. Copy the URL of your design and share it with your friends, who can then test, mod­ify, save, and even use it in battle.

Give it a try here: http://co.llide.com/editor

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Z God­dard

Z, a fan of hats and danc­ing to bad music, devel­ops games and code in Unity3D and WebGL. Always look­ing at new tech­nolo­gies for games, he has big dreams for Go.

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Moving a User-Generated Spaceship with Physics: Part I

The core con­cept behind co.llide is for play­ers to be able to build and then pilot their own cus­tomized, phys­i­cally sim­u­lated space­ships. This means that when a player stitches together a bunch of pieces into a ship, the game needs to fig­ure out how that ship should move depend­ing on player input. Ours is cer­tainly not the first game to ever address this prob­lem, but we thought an expla­na­tion of our spe­cific solu­tion would make an inter­est­ing post. But why just tell when I can show?

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Andrew Dolce

Andrew has a back­ground in com­puter graph­ics and aug­mented real­ity, and is excited about mak­ing games that look and feel awe­some. He also owns too many board games for his own good.

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Transition to 2D Vehicles — Why and How

Tin­kerTech Derby is a pretty fan­tas­tic con­cept, but we ran into a snag. We encoun­tered severe per­for­mance issues because we were try­ing to use 3D physics engines writ­ten in Javascript for a real-time online mul­ti­player game. Not nearly enough com­put­ers are capa­ble of run­ning that game as it was with any latency present. We decided that, if we were to con­tinue with the orig­i­nal premise of the game—and we really want to, because it’s really cool!—we would have to drop the third dimen­sion to our physics sim­u­la­tion. For­tu­nately, the 2D game­play is still very fun, and the core idea remains strong.

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Mak Mendel­son

Mak is an artist at Gra­di­ent Stu­dios. He stud­ied fine arts and then elec­tronic arts, focus­ing in char­ac­ter design. He really enjoys think­ing about var­i­ous game mechan­ics and how they work together, mix­ing and match­ing to cre­ate new ones that might one day end up in an actual game.

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