About Andrew Dolce

Andrew has a background in computer graphics and augmented reality, and is excited about making games that look and feel awesome. He also owns too many board games for his own good.

Modules, Magic: The Gathering, and the Next Steps for co.llide

co.llide-0.4.0-modules-black

One of our goals for ver­sion 0.4.0 of co.llide was to pro­vide a small but fairly bal­anced set of build­ing blocks, called mod­ules, for all play­ers to use in con­struct­ing ships. How­ever, vari­ety is the spice of life, and we plan to even­tu­ally release a large num­ber of unlock­able mod­ules for play­ers to add to their per­sonal col­lec­tions. In this post, I’ll be dis­cussing some ideas for these future mod­ules. I’ll also be talk­ing about a poten­tial prob­lem that we face as design­ers, and one par­tic­u­lar source of inspi­ra­tion that we believe offers the solution.

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Andrew Dolce

Andrew has a back­ground in com­puter graph­ics and aug­mented real­ity, and is excited about mak­ing games that look and feel awe­some. He also owns too many board games for his own good.

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Goodbye Eric Li

Today we say good­bye to Eric Li, who has been with Gra­di­ent for the past three years.

Eric’s abil­i­ties as a soft­ware engi­neer have made him a key mem­ber of the Gra­di­ent team. Using his exper­tise in graph­ics pro­gram­ming, Eric single-handedly built (and rebuilt) our graph­ics pipeline to meet the ever-changing needs of our projects. In exper­i­ment­ing with the look and feel of co.llide, we wanted to incor­po­rate dynamic light­ing effects. Eric took on the chal­lenge of imple­ment­ing these effects in Canvas2D, and found a way to make them work with­out sac­ri­fic­ing per­for­mance. He has also been involved in many other aspects of devel­op­ment, includ­ing net­work­ing, physics, and gameplay.

The team is grate­ful for Eric’s hard work and con­tri­bu­tions. Though he will be sorely missed, we wish him luck, and share in the excite­ment at his future endeavors.

Andrew Dolce

Andrew has a back­ground in com­puter graph­ics and aug­mented real­ity, and is excited about mak­ing games that look and feel awe­some. He also owns too many board games for his own good.

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Moving a User-Generated Spaceship with Physics: Part I

The core con­cept behind co.llide is for play­ers to be able to build and then pilot their own cus­tomized, phys­i­cally sim­u­lated space­ships. This means that when a player stitches together a bunch of pieces into a ship, the game needs to fig­ure out how that ship should move depend­ing on player input. Ours is cer­tainly not the first game to ever address this prob­lem, but we thought an expla­na­tion of our spe­cific solu­tion would make an inter­est­ing post. But why just tell when I can show?

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Andrew Dolce

Andrew has a back­ground in com­puter graph­ics and aug­mented real­ity, and is excited about mak­ing games that look and feel awe­some. He also owns too many board games for his own good.

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Simulating Network Lag for Testing Games

In devel­op­ing a net­worked game, some­times one needs to be able to test fea­tures run­ning over spe­cific net­work con­di­tions. How does the game hold up under high latency and/or packet loss? What about in cases of vary­ing net­work jit­ter, where the latency is ever-changing? Answer­ing these ques­tions is cru­cial to test­ing net­work code and mak­ing sure that it will per­form well against what­ever chaos the Inter­net might throw at you.

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Andrew Dolce

Andrew has a back­ground in com­puter graph­ics and aug­mented real­ity, and is excited about mak­ing games that look and feel awe­some. He also owns too many board games for his own good.

More PostsTwit­ter